A longitudinal analysis of nursing specialty certification by Magnet® status and patient unit type Journal Article


Authors: Boyle, Diane K.; Gajewski, Byron J.; Miller, Peggy A.
Article Title: A longitudinal analysis of nursing specialty certification by Magnet® status and patient unit type
Abstract: The objective of this study was to examine nursing specialty certification trends by Magnet® status and unit type. Research exploring organizational and unit attributes associated with higher specialty certification rates is timely given the beginning evidence that certification is associated with lower patient adverse events. The sample included 6047 units in 1249 National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators hospitals. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to predict growth in percentage of specialty-certified RNs within each unit type and Magnet status. Data (Bayesian Information Criteria = 224 583.30) demonstrated significant growth in specialty certification rates over time (P < .0001). Magnet-designated organizations had significantly different starting certification rates (P = .0002) and rates of change (P = .0002). Unit types also had significantly different starting certification rates (P < .0001) and different rates of change (P < .0001). Magnet recognition is associated with increases in specialty certification rates. Certification rates have risen faster in unit types such as pediatric critical care than in unit types such as adult step-down and adult surgical.
Keywords: Humans; United States; Nursing Evaluation Research; Hospital Units; Longitudinal Studies; Certification; Specialties, Nursing; Credentialing
Journal Title: The Journal of nursing administration
Volume: 42
Issue: 12
ISSN: 1539-0721
Publisher: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins  
Date Published: 2012
Start Page: 567
End Page: 573
DOI/URL:
Notes: The objective of this study was to examine nursing specialty certification trends by Magnet® status and unit type. Research exploring organizational and unit attributes associated with higher specialty certification rates is timely given the beginning evidence that certification is associated with lower patient adverse events. The sample included 6047 units in 1249 National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators hospitals. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to predict growth in percentage of specialty-certified RNs within each unit type and Magnet status. Data (Bayesian Information Criteria = 224 583.30) demonstrated significant growth in specialty certification rates over time (P < .0001). Magnet-designated organizations had significantly different starting certification rates (P = .0002) and rates of change (P = .0002). Unit types also had significantly different starting certification rates (P < .0001) and different rates of change (P < .0001). Magnet recognition is associated with increases in specialty certification rates. Certification rates have risen faster in unit types such as pediatric critical care than in unit types such as adult step-down and adult surgical.